PPBF: RON’S BIG MISSION

RonsBigMission

TITLE: RON’S BIG MISSION

AUTHOR: Rose Blue and Corinne J. Naden

ILLUSTRATOR: Don Tate

PUBLICATION INFO: Dutton, 2009

ISBN: 978-0-525-47849-2

SOURCE:  library

INTENDED AUDIENCE: ages 6 to 8

GENRE: picture book biography, historical fiction

OPENING and SYNOPSIS:

“You’re up early this morning, Ron. What’s the rush?” asked Mrs. McNair.

From the publisher:

“Nine-year-old Ron loves going to the Lake City Public Library to look through all the books on airplanes and flight. Today, Ron is ready to take out books by himself. But in the segregated world of South Carolina in the 1950s, Ron’s obtaining his own library card is not just a small rite of passage – it is a young man’s first courageous mission. Here is an inspiring story, based on Ron McNair’s life, of how a little boy, future scientist, and Challenger astronaut desegregated his library through peaceful resistance.”

THEMES/TOPICS: Civil Rights, equality, justice

WHY I LIKE THIS BOOK: McNair’s story will inspire young children to do something about justice and  inequality. McNair doesn’t follow “the rules,” but he’s moved to do what’s right.

RESOURCES:

  • Please see this past post about Martin Luther King, Jr. to learn how to talk about Civil Rights with very young children.
  • Here’s a Common Core aligned second-grade lesson plan for the book.
  • The Challenger Center has a number of educator resources, as well as information about the Space Shuttle mission.

You’ll find way more cool books at Susanna Leonard Hill’s “Perfect Picture Books.” Every Friday folks review a host of new books. Join us!

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20 responses to “PPBF: RON’S BIG MISSION

    • Hi Joanne, This one is actually considered historical fiction despite the depth of research. My guess is that the use of dialog is what makes it fiction. But it’s still a great book for teaching.

  1. Wow, when I recently saw an article about Ron I wondered if anyone had written a picture book about him. Et, voila!

    • It’s billed as historical fiction despite interviews with family members as sources. I’m always interested when NF books become historical fiction and why the authors choose to go that route.

  2. I like how a “little boy, future scientist, and Challenger astronaut desegregated his library through peaceful resistance”! Reminds us we can do our small bit to change the world for better 🙂

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